Tuesday, July 11, 2017

The Intriguing Appeal of a Provocative Hero by Gina Conkle


Whether they're alpha males leading the pack or lone-wolf types, we love our bad-boys. And they come in all modes: riding motorcycles, captaining a pirate ship, or a duke at the helm of a secret society.

Throw in a dash of humor, and you've got me. I love to read them as much as I love to write them. The irony is I'm not a funny person. So, it's a test of skill...a serious-natured woman writing a man of quick wit.

And just to make things interesting, I don't plan my characters. They come to me. When they do, I run with it. This was especially true of secondary characters, Juliette Sauveterre and Lord Marcus. Both were rich, colorful personalities in The Lady Meets Her Match [Midnight Meetings series, book 2].


When it came time for book 3, the big question was Whose story would be told? Juliette Sauveterre was a foreign creature to me, a femme-fatale who wants all eyes on her (especially the men).

Then there was Lord Marcus: too handsome for his own good, a heavy drinker, sharp-humored, and always at odds with his older brother. Interesting, but not the stuff of heroes. Yet, Lord Marcus won.

How does a woman get in the head of a wastrel?

My favorite "cheat-sheet" is that I live with three men. Being out-numbered is a blessing in disguise. I watch how they react, listen carefully to word choices, speech cadence, and subtle differences in sense of humor. Most people know men speak about half the words per day that women speak. But, men also use more imperatives/commands than women (i.e. "Give me that book." or "Come here."). I keep these things in mind when I write men.

Real life inspiration helps—a la Tom Hiddleston. In interviews, he's gentlemanly and humor comes naturally to him.

Tom Hiddleston inspired Lord Marcus Bowles.
Another "cheat-sheet" in my arsenal was a past series of seminars on men. When my boys were young, I signed up for weekend seminars on men, love, marriage, etc. This stemmed from my desire to be the best wife and mom I could be. I grew up in a household of four females and a military dad (in other words, gone a lot). Talk about living in a totally different dynamic!

Men are cut from the same mold when it comes to certain aspects. Personalities, talents, and drives are special to each person, but certain fundamental needs remain.


Six universal lessons I learned about men:

1) Men need to feel appreciated by the women in their lives
2) Men need to be our protectors
3) Men need to feel like they provide for us (like they can "win" with us)
4) Men need a woman's vitality
5) Men have single-focused brains
6) Certain male needs do a 180 degree change when they reach middle age

It took a long time to get to know Lord Marcus. I had to go deep into character to unearth his humor, his backstory, all the things that made him tick. The journey was intriguing. It was necessary to know him. Each male character I write must be individual. Nor do I want to effeminize a man (let the hero be the hero). This last point came to light during editing Lord Marcus, the hero in The Lord Meets His Lady [Midnight Meetings series, book 3]. I'll close with an anecdote about the book.

Edit notes had come for the manuscript. Reading them, I was struck by the editor's effusive, dramatic style. I later learned that she is involved with theater production with a passion for the 18th century. Much of her insight was spot on. Sometimes not. One place it didn't work was a sex scene in Lord Marcus's point of view.

My paraphrase of the scene...

Foreplay started slow and deliberate which soon turned white-hot and frantic. A frenzied Lord Marcus was fully dressed, his placket open. Genevieve was on the bed beneath him. He was half an inch from penetration. [Insert editor's note: "I'd like to know more of his emotions for her right now."]

I laughed hard. Remember #5 from above?

The male mind does not wax on about feelings during delirious sex! It doesn't matter if he's the tenderest beta or a snarky bad-boy. Men have one-track minds at heightened, sexual moments. Anything else in a book is a womanized version of a man.

So, here's to provocative heroes. May they continue to be the men we love.

                                                            ~Gina Conkle                                                                  


An excerpt of The Lord Meets His Lady by Gina Conkle
(here's the scene lead up)
Miss Genevieve Turner is a woman with a past. She's making a go as housekeeper in a cottage far from London, but Lord Bowles knows her secrets. He's shown up at her place of employment with a surprising proposition...



Genevieve picked up iron tongs and waved them at the sugar loaf. “Do you take sugar with your coffee, milord?”

Keen hazel eyes pinned her. “One small pinch, please. And you haven’t answered my question.”

She nipped the sugar and dropped the sweetener in his coffee and hers. The chunks bobbed helplessly in dark liquid.

“Why me?” She slid his cup across the table. “Until three nights ago, you couldn’t recall my name. I was nothing more than a bawdy-house worker to you.”

“A fair point. It’s as simple as I want to help you. You’re in some kind of distress.”

“Do I look like a woman in distress?” Her bottom found the chair facing him. “Forgive me, but in my experience, when men offer to help, it usually carries a price.”

Sunlight spilled over her morning visitor. With his good looks and gentleman’s demeanor, he could be an archangel come for a visit to sleepy Cornhill, but she knew better. Her lips twisted on hard-learned, bitter truth.

Men always got their needs met.

Lord Bowles stared out the kitchen window, his fine profile a stark relief against the limestone walls. The steaming coffee cup ignored, a somber pall washed over him. Wide shoulders bunched under his brown velvet coat as if he wrestled with an unseen weight.

“Would you accept my offer purely as a bid for friendship?”

The startling question came out of nowhere.

“I don’t understand. Friendship?” She drew the word out, testing it like a foreign flavor.

His fingertips drew light circles on the table. “That is what I offer.”

Her spoon wove circles in her coffee, clinking inside her mug. What an irregular request. “And you offer friendship because…”

Lord Bowles turned in his chair, the wood creaking as he faced her. “Because you are a woman in need and I want to help. Because I enjoy talking with you and find that I like you. Because…” He searched the air, finishing testily, “Because I don’t know. Must a man list his reasons for doing a good turn?”

The stirring stopped, a strange notion striking her. Lord Bowles was somehow at her mercy, a man in need, and she was the one he wanted to fill it.

A faint scowl marred his features. “Are you always this difficult, Miss Turner?”

“I’m afraid so, milord. Growing up, my mother was at her wit’s end with me.”

The breezy admission slipped out. She could blame it on stunning events of late. Twice in one day, Lord Bowles had accomplished what few men had done in her lifetime. He’d shocked her in the best way, first announcing he believed her when she said she’d not harm the Beckworths, and now this, a man seeking conversation and friendship because he found talking with her a pleasure. True, he’d ogled her breasts, but not once had he pawed them or pinched her bottom.

This turn was unusual and…nice. Lord Bowles sighed and braced a hand on the table. “Perhaps this was a bad idea.”

“Wait.” She grasped his sleeve. “You’re giving up already?”

“I’ll not force my friendship on you.”

Did he mean it? Friendship? A feather could’ve knocked her over.

“If you’ll beg pardon, milord, friendship between the likes of you with me… It’s most irregular.”

“It is.” His voice was honest and gentle. She was tempted to bask in it after a lifetime surrounded by brusque men.


“And me being a woman from less respectable parts has nothing to do with your…offer?”


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Gina Conkle writes lush Viking romance, sensual Georgian romance, and steamy contemporary romance. Her historical romances always offer a fresh, addictive spin on the genre, with the witty banter and sexual tension that readers crave. 

From commoners to lords and inventors to artists, Georgian romance gets a sensational twist in her Midnight Meetings series novels: Meet the Earl at Midnight, The Lady Meets Her Match, and The Lord Meets His Lady. In her Norse Series, featuring hot Vikings, you'll find evocative tales, rich in history, brimming with adventurous women and exciting alpha male heroes (take a look at Norse Jewel and To Find a Viking Treasure).

Gina's writing career began in southern California and despite all that sunshine, she prefers books over beaches and stone castles over sand castles. Now Gina lives in Michigan with her favorite alpha male, Brian and their two sons, where she occasionally gardens and cooks.


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Tell me in the comments below a favorite bad-boy hero (could be from a movie or a book). One random commenter will one of my ebooks (reader's choice). Name to be drawn, noon ET July 14, 2017.



6 comments:

  1. One of my favorite bad boys turned hero is Sebastian, Viscount St. Vincent, from Lisa Kleypas' Devil in Winter.

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  2. This is a very insightful and thought provoking blog article. I enjoyed it.Thank you! I have taken two workshops on writing the male POV and how it differs from the female. I try to keep what I learned in mind as I write my men but it always helps to have a reminder. :)

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  3. One of the things I've learned reading romance, and this is a scientific fact, is how other people think and feel. It is also one of the reasons I love reading the genre. It given me an insight into the male perspective of things and it's taught me a thing or two on how to deal with the every-day men in my life ;)
    My favorite bad boy has got to be Eric Northman from the Sookie Stackhouse/True Blood series.

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  4. I had to think really hard about this question, but my favorite, I think, is Ronan from Stiefvater's Raven Cycle series!

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  5. I love Sydney Carton from A Tale of Two Cities. He is a drunkard and never lives up to his potential. He could have been a great man. Bur he's complex. In the end, the bad boy becomes a hero by giving his life to save the man the love of his life loves.

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