Thursday, March 12, 2015

Touring the Past

One of the reasons I love reading and writing historical romance is because it gives me the opportunity to enter the past. I grant you, I do not enter the nitty gritty of the Regency era...there are no Luddites in my novels and very few wounded veterans. But there is something beautiful about Regency England that has called to me since I first picked up Jane Austen's PRIDE AND PREJUDICE.


As I sit at my own computer, and dream my romantic dreams, I sometimes think of Jane Austen, who was a good deal less romantic than I am, and who always had her eye on the financial dealings that came with any marriage. Though her characters married for love, they also married for comfort and wealth, something she was striving for with her own work. As a genteel woman, Miss Austen had very few options for earning her living, and her time at her desk was well spent, and earned her family much needed funds. Still, in spite of her thoughts on money that entered into every novel she wrote, I like to think of Miss Austen as a fellow dreamer.


Though I seem to gravitate now to swashbuckling heroines in my latest novel, TERROR OF THE TON (coming  out in December 2015 from Sourcebooks Casablanca) something in my soul calls for the quiet, simple tea taken in Elizabeth Bennet's parlor, while waiting for Mr. Darcy to call.

Ever since Christy English picked up a fake sword in stage combat class at the age of fourteen, she has lived vicariously through the sword-wielding women of her imagination. Sometimes an actor, always a storyteller, Christy works happily with Sourcebooks Casablanca to bring the knife-throwing women of her novels to life. A banker by day and a writer by night, she loves to eat chocolate, drink too many soft drinks, and walk the mountain trails of her home in North Carolina.


7 comments:

  1. She was definitely a romantic and a dreamer, though she might not appreciate that label. We just like a little more action in our stories!

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  2. I always considered that small table more valuable than the crown jewels. Can't wait to read you story.

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    1. Thank you Sally! I agree with you...that table is like a shrine :) I love Jane Austen's work...

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  3. I always considered that small table more valuable than the crown jewels. Can't wait to read you story.

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  4. I think part of the "beauty" of the Regency era was the politeness, courtly addresses and just plain ol' good manners. I know there were bad guys and gals, but the general populace and especially the "royals" were part of a gentler life than some of the mean spirits and hateful language and manners we see today. Thanks for your post, Christy. jdh2690@gmail.com

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    1. Amen Janice! I love those courtly manners and the rules for behavior We could use a little more of both I think :)

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